The squint UX test — Bank of America vs Lending Club

A nice little UI/UX test is the “Squint Test” — i.e. as you look at a screen or interface, squint or defocus your eyes, and see if you can discern the system’s structure and navigation.

Let’s say you’re a Lending Club or Bank of America customer. You’re probably going to represent one of the site’s more frequently accessing class of visitor, and so it’d be nice if logging in was one of the more efficient workflows.

To simulate the squint test, I’ve blurred both home pages. Have a look, and see if you can quickly identify the login links at Lending Club and Bank of America.

At Bank of America, if you guessed that the login is that big red block in the upper left, you’d be right.

At Lending Club, if you guessed that smallish gray button in the upper right, you’d be wrong; that says “Join Lending Club”. iIf you guessed one of those two big buttons in the middle of the home page, you’d be wrong; those are “See for yourself” and “Check your rate” (respectively).

The login, which is probably the most clicked item on the whole home page at Lending Club, is the small text item to the left of the Join button, which reads “Sign in”.

3 thoughts on “The squint UX test — Bank of America vs Lending Club”

  1. the sad reality is lendingclub has relatively no incentive to help their users log in. why would they help existing borrowers log in at the sacrifice of conversion?

  2. @nic — I’m actually a lender at LendingClub, so they should have incentive to make logging is as easy and efficient as possible. The motivation for this article was my visiting of the site to reinvest available cash, and then getting frustrated at not quickly finding the login link.

    Although I wish they’d give more importance to the user experience, I’m happy with the service overall. I’ve been with both LendingClub and Prosper for about two years, and remain excited about peer-to-peer lending as a concept.

Agree? Disagree? What do you think?

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.